You, Poverty and the World

This interactive infographic uses information on gender and nationality to compare your outcomes in health, education, human development, happiness and food availability to those of people in other countries (and the world average). Pretty neat!

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“Disciplining cultural minorities: 1960s housing guidelines for Inuit families”

After reading this post, I’ve decided that the Canadian definition of “crowded housing” seems pretty arbitrary: it forces minimum room requirements on the dwellings of people with more/older kids. Apparently, “a two bedroom house is suitable for up to two couples with one baby each” but if any of the children are 12 or older, the same house is considered overcrowded. The post talks about adult education programs for Inuits, and there’s an illustration from the 1960’s “Eskimo Rental Housing” pamphlet. Cultural norms and forced assimilation aside, that policy is all kinds of problematic for low income families. Finding a bigger apartment is expensive (so families will probably downgrade in neighbourhood quality), time consuming (you can only take so many days off when you live paycheck-to-paycheck), and would hurt kids a lot more than this so-called overcrowding would. Thoughts?